____________________________________________

 Michelle Veenemans brings magic to Auto & General Theatre on the Square - Sandton!

By Martin Lane, Martin Lane Entertainment, 02 November 2018

Her lunch time show "The wonderful world of jazz" showed off Michelle's superb vocal control over standards such as "What a wonderful world", "It's only a paper moon", "Let's face the music and dance", "Big spender" and "The lady is a tramp". The famous duet "Together, wherever we go", joined by her mother Barbara Veenemans, from Sondheim's "Gypsy", brought the house down and it called for an encore. Michelle topped her show with the rock version of the famous Queen of the Night aria [Mozart] and a beautiful classical rendition of Puccini's "Nessun dorma". Thank you, thank you - baie dankie!


Who says sopranos can’t have fun

by Hannie Hefer – January 2018

South African dramatic coloratura soprano, Michelle Veenemans, during an elegant and fancy evening at the Lemon Jack Theatre in Pretoria, recently released her latest CD on the StarBlaze label.

During this fun-filled evening, “Moeder”– Barbara Veenemans’s 80th birthday anniversary was celebrated as well.

Artwork by Santa Mentz

“Prima donna ‘drama queen’ deluxe”

With “Wonderful World of Jazz” Michelle returns to her first love of music namely, Jazz, which has been an integral part of her vocal development since her childhood days. She studied Jazz-singing under the careful guidance of her mother Barbara Veenemans who also acted as musical advisor during the recording sessions.

The “Wonderful World of Jazz” album is a compilation of all Michelle’s favourite Jazz Standards. She wisely allowed the project to mature for several years before eventually committing it to disc.

Her classical singing has been described as “exhilarating” by Artslink SA, as “one of South Africa’s most entertaining sopranos” by the SA Jewish Report, as a “prima donna and ‘drama queen’ deluxe” by Cue Newspaper, as a “superb interpreter” by Beeld Newspaper and “having an unusual voice” by the Rapport Newspaper.

In this bumper-packed album, the listener can now enjoy another side of Michelle – a Michelle with a “delightful ripeness and subtleness of voice”.

Source: http://www.hannieheferpromotions.co.za/who-says-sopranos-cant-have-fun/

____________________________________________

Artslink.co.za

Classical Notes: ArtSpoken & Reviews  

By William Charlton-Perkins

Copy Dog Editorial Enterprises CC
08/04/2011

... My third birthday disc, a debut CD recital of operetta favourites by the South African soprano Michelle Veenemans, drew the surprise and delight of fresh discovery. Entitled ‘Schenk man sich Rosen’, this is named after the opening number from Zeller’s Der Vogelhändler.

Given the singer’s ravishingly lovely instrument, used with consummate artistry, her casket of vocal bon-bons defies the satiation that might follow repeated playing of this sugared repertoire. Try the second and third tracks, Lehar’s heavenly ‘Love live forever’ from Paganini, and the same composer’s ubiquitous ‘Vilja’ from The Merry Widow. And to cap this, play the penultimate track, Puccini’s ever-popular ‘Doretta’s Dream’ from La Rondine.

Throughout her programme, Veenemans offers singing that is characterised by exemplary diction and crystalline attack. Displaying a grasp of Viennese style in the grand tradition of legends such as Hilde Gueden and Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, this singer never puts a foot wrong. She deploys her creamy soprano’s extensive range, from a lusciously developed chest register to gleaming high notes, with a heady combination of abandon and control that constantly enlivens the music at hand.

The soprano’s exhilarating singing is matched by the passion and commitment of her accompanists, pianist Willem Luitingh and violinist Bambie Heiberg. The three musicians’ collaboration results in close-on an hour’s listening that evokes the potent charm of palm-court music-making at its best. To acquire this disc, call 012 654 3087. For more information about Michelle Veenemans, whose musical pedigree stems from a cultural dynasty that includes her mother and aunt, the celebrated South African sopranos, Barbara and Leonore Veenemans, log onto
http://veenemanssopranos.yolasite.com. ...

Source:  http://www.associateprogramsplus.com/news/Michelle-(German-singer).html

________________________________________________

Newspaper: SA Jewish Report

Friday 1 April 2011

 By Rita Lewis

 

SONGSTRESS MICHELLE VEENEMANS WOWS SECOND INNINGS

 

THE WELL-CHOSEN selection and performance of songs to depict “Vienna, City of my Dreams” organised by the Jewish Community Services for Second Innings, was a treat for all those attending. The event featured renowned coloratura soprano Michelle Veenemans, her mother Barbara Veenemans who also introduced and explained each of the songs to be sung, as well as welcoming Betsie Schaap and Gerrit Koorsen on the cello and piano. In a magnificent ball gown of burgundy with gold embroidery and performing on a stage draped with gold material across the wall behind her and large gold stars hanging from the ceiling above her, Michelle Veenemans transported the audience to La Scala, the Sydney Opera House and Covent Garden – to another world anywhere, but where they were in the Gerald Horwitz Lounge at Golden Acres. Veenemans is one of South Africa’s most entertaining sopranos. She is a superb interpreter of both the music and the storyline. She has an extraordinary range which she utilised with much artistic emotion, portraying characters in songs and operas and bringing them to life.


... Her repertoire included Franz Lehar’s Leibe, du Himmel auf Erden and the well-known Vilja Lied; popular songs by Strauss included Mein Herr Marquis from Die Fledermaus; and Shenkt Man Sich Rosen in Tyrol by Carl Zeller. Veenemans who comes from a well-known musical family, made her remarkable debut at age three in a concert alongside her mother and the late Rudi Neitz. She follows in the footsteps of formidable musical talent, with her mother Barbara – from whom she received her initial training, aunt Leonore and uncle Ben all of whom have made an impressive contribution to opera, operetta and musicals in South Africa.

 ________________________________________________________

 

A bravura performance indeed

Newspaper: Cue   - 3 July 2010

Jeff Brukman

Michelle Veenemans (soprano) dazzled and wowed her audience, earning a well-deserved standing ovation at the conclusion of her National Arts Festival debut recital. Ably assisted by Paul Ferreira (piano) and Gerrit Koorsen (cello) this programme testified to thorough preparation and technically flawless delivery.

This prima donna “drama queen” deluxe revelled in the dramatic theatricalities of each work, dominating the stage with confidence and panache...

In the opening item, Handel’s Ode for the birthday of Queen Anne, Veenemans revelled in the setting’s rich Baroque ornamentation and stratospheric tessitura. Her well-developed soprano range, outstanding breath control and clear understanding of phrasing were to the fore in this riveting performance, though she should try to avoid scooping at the opening of phrases.

In a concert version of Ach ich liebte, from Mozart’s Die Entführing aus dem Serail, Veenemans exemplary use of facial expression (especially her eyes) aided in projecting the dramatic essence of the music. She showed complete technical mastery of florid passages, and the ornamentation and echo colouring in the coloratura range were handled with aplomb.

Traversing numerous genres and styles of performance with ease, Veenemans coaxed multiple vocal colours from a wide prism of tonal shadings in Floyd’s The Trees on the Mountains (Susannah) and Herbert’s Art is calling for me (The Enchantress)...

____________________________________

OPEN WRITING: WEB MAGAZINE

April 2010 - Review by Isabel Bradley


MICHELLE VEENEMANS IN CONCERT AT CRAWFORD COLLEGE

 

At lunch-time on Friday, Leon and I attended the Lunch-Hour Concert at Crawford College. The venue for these excellent concerts recently changed from a small theatre to a school hall, which is far less salubrious though the acoustics are better. This was a performance by Diva-par-excellence, Michelle Veenemans, accompanied by Gerrit Koorsen on cello and Paul Ferreira on piano. The men arrived on-stage first, elegant in tuxedoes. Michelle made her grand entrance, sweeping through the gorgeous red-velvet curtains and sinking to the floor in a deep curtsey. Her shimmering pink ball-gown ballooned around her and diamantés glittered around her neck, dripped into her cleavage and dangled from her ears. It all seemed a little over-the-top for an audience seated on plastic chairs in a barn-like, multi-purpose hall.

Once the performance began, however, everyone was mesmerized by the fantasies Michelle wove with her voice. The first work was from Handel’s Ode for the Birthday of Queen Anne: Eternal Source of Light Divine, a very difficult work, beautifully executed. The accompaniment was mellow and throughout the performance, piano and ‘cello replaced the orchestra with ease. Michelle announced her next Aria, “Ach Ich liebte” by Mozart, saying that this was a ‘bravura’ aria. The term ‘bravura’, she explained, means the singer must have a perfect technique and ‘a huge amount of courage’. 

She proceeded to sing five incredible bravura show-pieces: first the Mozart, immediately followed by American composer Carlisle Floyd’s ‘The Trees on the Mountains’ from his opera Susanna. Then came Verdi’s Caro nome from Rigoletto and Victor Herbert’s ‘Art is Calling for Me’. Interspersed between these magnificent arias, Gerrit and Paul played short instrumental pieces, creating a pleasant contrast of sonorities and allowing Michelle a few moments to prepare for her next singing marathon. They ended the programme with Leonard Berstein’s ‘Glitter and be Gay’ from Candide.

What a virtuosic performance it was. Michelle’s voice floated up to the highest of notes with an ease and sweetness that is seldom heard, she became the personalities depicted in each aria, singing sheer emotion into every note: grief, joy, love, passion, fun and laughter. The audience loved every moment, though a mobile phone ring tone and two patrons leaving during the performance momentarily took our attention.

Source: http://www.openwriting.com/archives/2010/04/musical_delight_1.php

_____________________________________________________________________________

NEWSPAPER REVIEW (TRANSLATION FROM AFRIKAANS TO ENGLISH)

NEWSPAPER: RAPPORT, DATE: 7 SEPTEMBER 2008, By Paul Boekkooi

  

MICHELLE VEENEMANS – BRAVURA!


Leonore, Barbara, and now Michelle. We know that the Veenemans-women can sing. Michelle, the youngest in the Veenemans-lineage, has an unusual voice that in a positive sense can be described as a “freak”.


 As coloratura soprano, she fears nothing – that is why she undertakes two Mozart arias where few would dare to go, namely K316 and K418. Technically, they break all safe norms and Michelle excels in these challenges. Her voice does not only have the ability, but also the bravado and dramatic power that are required.


Tenors boast with their high Cs. This soprano reaches an A-flat above that C. After the Mozart, the programme becomes “tamer”, but she does not let it sound as such. She lives dangerously, but delivers the musical goods. It is hard work to listen to such a soprano, but she lets your mouth willingly hang open.

_____________________________________________________________________

NEWSPAPER REVIEW (TRANSLATION FROM AFRIKAANS TO ENGLISH)

NEWSPAPER: BEELD, ART SECTION: PLUS

DATE: 20 DECEMBER 2007

By Thys Odendaal

 

 … The soprano from Pretoria, Michelle Veenemans, has obviously developed her vocal flair at her mother’s knee, with mother Barbara still involved in her coloratura daughter’s career. Earlier this year, Michelle, recorded Bravura! with mother as musical director. Veenemans is again singing rather adventurous coloratura arias, mostly known and associated with this swift and strong voice; but also thankfully included two Mozart concert arias as well as Ach, ich liebte from Die Entführung. Later, from the same opera, the “impossible” Martern aller Arten sung with less panache. Her accompanist, Paul Ferreira, seems to be as fearless as Veenemans and these two are most of the time exceptionally exiting. It is such a pity that our singers rarely have the chance to sing with a full opera orchestra …

________________________________________________________________________


NEWSPAPER REVIEW (TRANSLATION FROM AFRIKAANS TO ENGLISH)

NEWSPAPER: BEELD, ART SECTION: PLUS

DATE: 24 MAY 2007

By Gerrit Jordaan


 SOLOISTS CONVINCE WITH THE DEPTH OF THE “STABAT MATER”

Stabat Mater (Pergolesi)

Nazareth House, Pretoria

 

 Last Sunday, Pergolesi’s (1710 – 1736) Stabat Mater sounded well in the marble shrouded Nazareth House Chapel. Pergolesi’s melodic talent can be heard in this intimate work for soprano and alto soloists as well as string accompaniment. The classical Latin text captures the emotions of the Mother of Jesus as she lives through the execution of her Son.


 In this performance, Michelle Veenemans (soprano) and Paul Ferreira (counter tenor) as soloists portrayed the depth of the emotions of this work convincingly. Veenemans sparkled in her interpretation of the role. The definition of sound (which continually consisted of lightness) is a particular attractive quality in her voice.


 It was a surprise to hear Paul Ferreira, who regularly accompanies Veenemans as pianist, in the alto role. Although the two singers emphatically sang together, their voice qualities differ drastically. Both singers’ musicality is to be praised.


 Christo Burger competently directed the string ensemble that consisted of a string quartet and harpsichord.

 ____________________________________________________________________________

NEWSPAPER REVIEW (TRANSLATION FROM GERMAN TO ENGLISH)

NEWSPAPER: ALLGEMEINE ZEITUNG – NAMIBIA

DATE: 22 SEPTEMBER 2006

By Hannah Suppa

 

MOZART’S CLASSIC OPERA, “DIE ZAUBERFLÖTE”, AT THE NATIONAL THEATRE IN WINDHOEK

 

A different Zauberflöte

 

Performing opera in Windhoek is a rare occasion. Sandy Rudd, together with the Bank Windhoek Arts Festival, staged Mozart’s opera Die Zauberflöte at the National Theatre. A shortened version of the classic opera, but done with a great love for detail.


 Before one can judge the staging of this Zauberflöte, one should forget for a moment everything you ever read or heard about this famous opera. One should forget the big stages where Tamino tried to save Pamina, one should forget the great singers who sang Papageno and the Queen of the Night, and should only focus on the Windhoek production.


 The Namibian Zauberflöte does not begin with music – the Bank Windhoek Arts Festival Organiser Aldo Behrens greets the audience on stage with a ”Good evening boys and girls”. He takes the role of a grandfather that tells the story of a great love and a magical flute. With white hair and an elegantly calm voice, he provides in English a short summary of the story and the characters. Behrens sits charmingly in a spotlight in the orchestra pit in front of a music stand. Instead of the usual opera digital text translations, the Festival Director explains the plot to the non-German speaking audience. A good idea that suits the opera – it is not without reason that the Zauberflöte is sometimes described as an opera for children or a “first light opera“. Sandy Rudd saves time by using this technique of explaining the plot, so that the focus is placed on the singing.


 A painted forest on cardboard material serves as backdrop for the first scene – the singers are musically accompanied only by the pianist Laetitia Orlandi. There is unfortunately not a typical Zauberflöte orchestra of flutes, clarinets, oboes, horns, and other wind instruments.


 One of the singers that could compete with the absence of the orchestra in vocal strength was for example, the “Queen of the Night”, sung by Michelle Veenemans. She interprets the difficult and dramatic coloratura soprano magnificently and creates a spontaneous burst of applause – she wears a flowing dark blue gleaming dress and a shining crown. This is how one imagines the “Queen of the Night” to be.


 Less convincing of the evening’s performance was the main character Tamino, sung by Arthur Swan. Although he was sick, as announced by Aldo Behrens at the start, the enchanting Hanli Stapela (Pamina)’s soprano outsung his slightly scratched tenor during their duets. Pity.


 The settings on stage change from scene to scene: Sometimes in a forest, then a pyramid, that represents the realm of Sarastro, fire and water, a divan with a black backdrop – everything obviously handmade. However, the coloured and especially kitsch chain lights in the forest with the first entrance of the “Queen of the Night” were maybe a bit too much.


 The performance of the paradise bird Papageno (humoristic and very well sung by Denver Smith) was also at this Windhoek production the highlight; a colourful feathered-costume, panpipes and always a funny line of dialogue. Papageno is one of the most loved characters in opera; and his duet with Papagena in the 9th scene of the second act was simply cheerful.


 Sandy Rudd has planned a lot for the Arts Festival: Apart from the Zauberflöte, the director stages at the same time the musical “Lion’s Roar”.


 Despite staging two large projects, the Mozart-production is successful, especially when one looks at it from a Namibian point of view and not thinking of the European productions of this classic opera.

___________________________________________________________________________

NEWSPAPER REVIEW (TRANSLATION FROM AFRIKAANS TO ENGLISH)

NEWSPAPER: BEELD, ART SECTION: PLUS

DATE: 06 APRIL 2006

By Thys Odendaal

 

VEENEMANS’S “LENTELIED” A WELCOME ADDITION


The soprano, Michelle Veenemans’s first CD Schenkt man sich Rosen – solely devoted to operetta arias – is a highly credible recording that portrays her as a proficient exponent of the genre.


 Her second CD also includes operetta arias, but in Afrikaans. She made the recording at the end of last year to commemorate the 130th year of the Afrikaans Language. It is called Lentelied, and besides the operetta arias, includes well-known works from the Afrikaans Song Collection.


 From a technical point of view, the CD is also an “experiment”. It was recorded in different locales in the Voortrekker Monument in order to generate acoustical variations.


 Eight arias and songs were recorded in the Cenotaph Hall with piano accompaniment, and four songs in the Hall of Heroes on the upper level with organ and guitar accompaniment. The acoustics of the Cenotaph Hall is pure and more clinical and the vastness of the Hall of Heroes with a clear reverberation is prominent.


 The accompaniment is throughout of high standard – Paul Ferreira (piano), Abri Jordaan (guitar), Dawid Venter (flute), and Zania van Wyk (organ).


 Veenemans is a dramatic coloratura and does not hesitate to exhibit her pyrotechnical vocalising. Her singing is throughout exciting, such as in the title track where the flute is used to imitate the flying dance of the butterfly. Here one of the many coloratura ornamentations was included to support the song.


 The flute and piano accompaniments in Sproetenooi complement the bright voice. And in Gee my, the two instruments support the more dramatic context. The approach to PJ Lemmer’s well-known Kokkewiet is slower than the “normal” tempo. It is approached as a ballad. Because of the echo effect that the text and music imitates from each other, one would like to hear how it would be performed in the Hall of Heroes with its high ceiling.


 The operetta arias fit in with the mostly sentimental nature of the songs and again prove how much musically better it sounds when German text is translated into Afrikaans rather than English. The Afrikaans is much more closer to the Viennese operetta. In English, the operetta tends to sound a bit like the D’Oyle Carte idiom, as was the case with the Carl Rosa Company from London, which recently performed The Merry Widow in Johannesburg.


 The guitar accompaniment especially in Mali, die Slaaf se Lied sounds exceptionally appropriate, but it is not certain if the choice of locale was correct. The melancholic undertone in the traditional song, Al lê die Berge nog so Blou is less successful. The result tends to the more sensuous coquetting of a woman with her lover, than a woman’s ruminative longing of her beloved.

 The sound of the organ in Moeder is a true demonstration of the appreciated sentiments that are expressed, but do not fit with the length of the notes and chord passages that can be obtained from a piano or orchestra.

 Veenemans’s Lentelied makes a very good overall impression. It is a welcome contribution to the Afrikaans Song Repertoire on the CD shelf.

 §         LENTELIED: Michelle Veenemans (soprano) with instrumentalists, Cesar’s Sound CS 1205.

 __________________________________________________________________________

NEWSPAPER REVIEW (TRANSLATION FROM AFRIKAANS TO ENGLISH)

NEWSPAPER: BEELD, ART SECTION: PLUS

DATE: 13 MARCH 2006

By Low Steyn


 MICHELLE VEENEMANS A SUPERB INTERPRETER


The soprano Michelle Veenemans is a gifted singer, a superb interpreter. This Michelle Veenemans in Concert was highly satisfactorily, with many highlights.


 The aria Martern aller Arten from Mozart’s Die Entführung aus dem Serail and Offenbach’s “Doll Song“ from Les contes d’Hoffmann was as expected outstandingly performed. However, the surprise was this soprano’s excellent rendition of Ebben neandro lontana from La Wally of Catalani. Veenemans has always impressed as coloratura soprano and from excerpts from the bel canto operas, but in this very different style she equally excelled – a lyric and dramatic interpretation full of passion, as it should be, that one would not have expected. Well done!


 We also know Veenemans as a good operetta soloist, as evident on her CD – and in this category, her Czardas from Strauss’s Fledermaus was the best.


 Mother Barbara is splendid with her narratives and much better than most that always have to say something during concerts.

 Paul Ferreira is a good piano accompanist, and his support to Lizet Smith in works for clarinet and piano of Poulenc and Arnold illustrated his versatility with regard to instrument and voice accompaniment.


 With this concert as indication, one can only look forward to more concerts from Hannie Hefer Promotions.

 ____________________________________________________________________________

NEWSPAPER REVIEW (EXCERPT TRANSLATION FROM AFRIKAANS TO ENGLISH)

NEWSPAPER: BEELD, ART SECTION: PLUS, DATE: 29 DECEMBER 2005, By Thys Odendaal


NOT MUCH, BUT EXCELLENT: SOUTH AFRICAN ART MUSIC RECORDINGS HOLDING THEIR OWN


 The newspaper article provides an overview of classical recordings of the year 2005.

 “Three records that can be mentioned is Michelle Veenemans’s brilliant operetta CD, Schenkt man sich Rosen, the flautist Liesel Stoltz with Pedro Rodrigues’s (guitar) Histoire du Tango and the UNISA double album of the Tenth International Piano Competition 2004.”

 __________________________________________________________________________________

NEWSPAPER REVIEW (EXCERPT TRANSLATION FROM AFRIKAANS TO ENGLISH)

NEWSPAPER: BEELD, ART SECTION: PLUS, DATE: 22 DECEMBER 2005, By Thys Odendaal

 

MORE OPERA, BUT THE QUALITY STILL TOO INCONSISTENT

 

The newspaper article provides an overview of classical performances during the year 2005.

 “ … [soprano Zanne Stapelberg] and the soprano Michelle Veenemans (in Montpellier in Park Town) provided the little vocal excitement of the year here in the North”.

 _____________________________________________________________________________

NEWSPAPER REVIEW (TRANSLATION FROM AFRIKAANS TO ENGLISH)

NEWSPAPER: BEELD, ART SECTION: PLUS, DATE: 19 OCTOBER 2005, By Thys Odendaal


VEENEMANS IMPRESSIVE IN HER VOCAL “FLAIR”

 Musaion, Pretoria


 Art, and especially opera singing, is like cricket. You can practise for hours in the nets but the real test lies on the pitch in front of a crowd. A singer can warm the voice, but on stage, you stand on your own. Traps are everywhere, despite the hard work beforehand. The difference is that the sportsman cannot choose his own programme, but the singer can.


 Michelle Veenemans’s choice to sing the Olympia aria from Offenbach’s Les contes d’Hoffmann is on spot – she sings it excellently – but this is not an aria to open an opera concert. It is too technical.


 It is probably successful in one concert, but not for another. It is however important that the first aria does make an impression.


 If she had sung the Les oiseaux dans la charmille later in the “Flair” programme, then the sudden soundless breath on the note would not have happened.


 The dramatised renditions of the arias were excellently done. The very good impression she made earlier in Johannesburg confirmed her vocalisation in the more advantageous Musaion. Aside from her long legato phrases, her coloratura work was colourful and well prepared. She is both suited as Adele and Rosalinda in Fledermaus, with a provocative Czardas, characteristic of her overall performance …


 One cannot imagine why Veenemans has never been heard in a full performance. (In our dreadful opera industry, not at all a surprise).

 _______________________________________________________________________________

NEWSPAPER REVIEW (TRANSLATION FROM AFRIKAANS TO ENGLISH)

NEWSPAPER: BEELD, ART SECTION: PLUS, DATE: 13 OCTOBER 2005, By Thys Odendaal

 

VEENEMANS VOCALLY SPARKLES ON HER BRILLIANT OPERETTA CD

 

The operetta is a highly specialised art form. It is a genre with its roots in Austria, more specific in the music city of Vienna, and is in its light heartedness and Schmaltz a mirror image of an era at the end of the 19th Century and first half of the 20th Century – a social setting of elegance and sophistication.


 Similar music genres also developed elsewhere – the Zarzuela in Spain and the Musical in the USA – and it demands a specific approach to present it with style within the genre. Occasionally singers underestimate the operetta to their own detriment. The sometimes-uninteresting characters and small storylines do not imply that the music is less demanding. Most sopranos have been challenged by the Czardas in Strauss’s Fledermaus.


 The soprano Michelle Veenemans’s CD, Schenkt man sich Rosen, is a more than welcome contribution to the South African CD catalogue. She has an instinctive feeling for the genre. Operetta music apparently flows in her Veenemans veins – Michelle being a descendent of two former brilliant operetta exponents, also both sopranos – mother Barbara and aunt Leonore …


 Michelle firstly has the vocal ability and feeling to let an operetta aria live – aria for sure, which means that one would love to hear her in a complete operetta. Her coloratura is agile and sometimes risky, but suits the contents of the arias.


 An important component of her interpretation is the capable way in which she handles the rhythmic aspect – the ritardandos and extension of phrases that give the melody the “swing” in a waltz or polka.

She deserves a bunch of red roses!

 ______________________________________________________________________________

NEWSPAPER: BEELD, ART SECTION: PLUS, DATE: 18 FEBRUARY 2004, NEWSPAPER REVIEW (TRANSLATION FROM AFRIKAANS TO ENGLISH)

By Thys Odendaal

 

SOPRANO SPARKLES

MICHELLE VEENEMANS MONTPELLIER, PARK TOWN NORTH

 

Michelle Veenemans is not only an extremely good singer, but also a first-class entertainer, half in an old-fashioned way where the opera stars have their audiences eating out of their hands with entertaining little stories.


 This blonde soprano from Pretoria – the genes sparkle of talent that she inherited from mother (Barbara) and aunt (Leonore) – compiled a programme of coloratura arias that somehow demands self-confidence and a portion of courage, even if it is only for a concert in a restaurant.


 With Offenbach’s Olympia aria, she evidently had no trouble and had enough time to mimic the doll’s character. Where her staccato coloratura impressed in Hoffman, so did the floating legato in Caro nome from Verdi’s Rigoletto, full of passion and love on Valentine’s Eve. Her Julliette was excellent, with the well-known aria Je veux vivre filled with waltzing grace of a devoted young girl; unthinkable that we probably would never hear her in a complete production. Arditi’s Il bacio, was coquettish, brilliantly vocalised …


 Veenemans’s evening was a small triumph!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make a free website with Yola